Friday, December 23, 2016

Christmas meet up

 Modern-day Coronado began in 1885 with the purchase of a one-time Spanish rancho that spanned Coronado, North Island and the Silver Strand. A small partnership led by Elisha Babcock and Hampton Story purchased all this for a mere $110,000. Their vision was to establish “the grandest hotel on the Pacific coast” set within a master-planned community featuring wide avenues, parklands, handsome public buildings, and attractive beachside residences.











Caught in a decoration 
Coronado and the Hotel del Coronado would grow together, side by side, for decades — each equally benefiting the other. The beloved “Hotel Del” would become the coast’s largest and grandest hotel while Coronado would develop an uncommon level of charm in the midst of a near-perfect climate. We managed to arrive in the not so perfect weather- cloudy and rain but not too cold.






ice skating by the beach

Through the tour bus window back in San Diego

 Considered the "birthplace" of California, visitors can witness the living legacy of California's birthplace in Old Town San Diego State Historic Park Its many preserved historic buildings and museums allow you to "go back in time" and visit California's history firsthand.
The Old Town State Historical Park maintains a collection of 19th-century homes and businesses that give visitors a glimpse into colonial life in San Diego.


 Seek out the old adobe ranch homes, schoolhouse and graveyard spread among the occupied areas of the neighborhood, Kit Carson was among the first pioneers to raise the American flag here in 1846. There are also numerous rumors of ghost sightings in the area—most persistently at the old Whaley House Museum on San Diego Avenue.


Constructed in 1825, Casa de Estudillo unveils the lifestyle of a prominent San Diego family. Standing as the the most famous of the original adobe buildings in Old Town, it’s furnished with representative items from the 16th to 20th centuries within its 13 rooms.



Santa was holding court back in the Seaport 

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